Posts Tagged ‘DOD’

How and why the Pentagon established their control of movie scripts

Published March 8th 2017

I recently acquired some decades-old Pentagon directives and instructions. These documents formed the basis for DOD policy in their engagement with the entertainment industry, establishing a range of conflicting criteria for the military’s liaisons with film and TV producers. This provided them with a range of bases for altering scripts and censoring scenes, at a time when the MPAA and the Production Code were ceasing to be effective at keeping the movie industry in line with their propaganda objectives.

Spy Culture in the American Journal of Economics and Sociology

Published March 7th 2017

It is with some pride that I can announce that the American Journal of Economics and Sociology has today published an edition featuring not just one, not just one and a half but two articles that I wrote. The latest issue of AJES focuses on the role of the CIA and DOD in Hollywood and includes articles by Pearse Redmond, Aaron Franz, Tarzie and others.

Subscriber Podcast #5 – The Pentagon’s Hollywood Database

Published March 5th 2017

In this month’s subscriber podcast I talk about the Pentagon’s database on their collaboration with Hollywood – what it is, how I got it and what it contains. I highlight some of the more provocative and politically relevant entries and provide details on how the Pentagon rewrote elements of films such as Forrest Gump and […]

ClandesTime 099 – Jack Valenti

Published January 29th 2017

Jack Valenti was a special assistant to President Lyndon Johnson, a consultant to the State Department and the third head of the MPAA. In this episode we look at his life, focusing in two key areas – the introduction of the film classification ratings system and Valenti’s connections with the CIA.

Pentagon Production Assistance Agreement for United 93

Published December 15th 2016

United 93 was the first and – to date – the only major movie to depict what happened in the skies over the US on the morning of the 9/11 attacks. The film-makers intended it to be as accurate and realistic as possible, so they reached out to the Pentagon and the US Air Force in particular for assistance. However, if anything this contributed to the numerous inaccuracies and problems with the narrative in the movie, as it contains a blend of two different stories told by the Pentagon about their responses on 9/11.

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