Posts Tagged ‘spy books’

Spy Culture in the American Journal of Economics and Sociology

Published March 7th 2017

It is with some pride that I can announce that the American Journal of Economics and Sociology has today published an edition featuring not just one, not just one and a half but two articles that I wrote. The latest issue of AJES focuses on the role of the CIA and DOD in Hollywood and includes articles by Pearse Redmond, Aaron Franz, Tarzie and others.

Subscriber Podcast #4 – The Spy Novel that Predicted Trump

Published February 6th 2017

The Twentieth Day in January was published in 1980 and tells the story of an MI6 officer discovering that the Russian government is blackmailing the incoming president. In this subscriber-only podcast we take a look at the book and dwell a little on its implications, and I offer my views on why the whole Trump-Russia-Dossier nonsense has so quickly fallen from the media spotlight. This podcast is only available to Patreon subscribers.

What Connects Jack Valenti, E Howard Hunt and The Godfather?

Published January 31st 2017

On the face of it former CIA officer, Watergate burglar and confessed JFK assassin E Howard Hunt shouldn’t have had much to do with former MPAA president Jack Valenti. They both served in WW2 (Hunt in the OSS, Valenti in the Army Air Forces) and both died in 2007. They may both have been present at the John Kennedy assassination. Then there is that special screening of The Godfather.

NSA Report on John le Carré Novels

Published January 5th 2017

Recently made available by Cryptome this NSA report originally appeared in an issue of their publication Cryptolog in 1992. It examines the role that signals intelligence (SIGINT) plays in the storylines of several John le Carré novels and considers whether the inaccuracies and limitations in these portrayals are of benefit to the NSA. They assess the influence of the novels on both the general public and on policy makers and in a moment of great irony they accuse le Carré of overlooking the moral consequences of his more favoured human intelligence (HUMINT), while doing the exact same thing themselves.

CIA Documents on Scorpio – The First Movie to Film at Langley

Published October 11th 2016

Scorpio holds the dubious distinction of being the first film to be allowed to shoot at the CIA headquarters in Langley. Since then the likes of Patriot Games and Argo are among a very small number to have been granted that privilege. It has otherwise been overlooked in favour of more significant thrillers of that decade but it was important enough for the CIA to have some files about it, both internal documents and open source records.

Support